Iran banned the import of Western passenger cars in 2017 to counter the impending reimposition of U.S. sanctions over its nuclear program. The idea was part of Tehran's efforts to develop a "resistance economy" that could both serve Iranians' demands for cars, lessen dependence on foreign technology, and potentially boost export revenue.

With demand surging for new automobiles in Iran, the government took steps last year to reverse a long-standing ban on the import of foreign cars. But while the move was seen as a road to meeting customer needs, the initiative has mysteriously stalled, reports Radio Farda.

The situation leaves consumers with little choice but to keep waiting in line for the opportunity to buy domestically produced vehicles in support of an industry accused of rampant corruption and putting “death wagons” on the road.

Iran banned the import of Western passenger cars in 2017 to counter the impending reimposition of U.S. sanctions over its nuclear program. The idea was part of Tehran’s efforts to develop a “resistance economy” that could both serve Iranians’ demands for cars, lessen dependence on foreign technology, and potentially boost export revenue.

But the idea has not worked as planned.

Auto production has fallen significantly in the country. And despite growing complaints about abnormally high prices and concerns about the quality and safety of domestically produced cars and Chinese imports, there are far more potential customers than available vehicles.

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