“I’m trying to bear witness but it’s just too much,” Buffalo, New York, resident Yvonne Woodard said of the rampage Saturday outside Tops Friendly Market. A young white man wearing body armor and livestreaming with a helmet camera opened fire Saturday, killing 10 Black people. “You can’t even go to the damn store in peace,” Woodard said.

In far-flung cities, deadly violence ripped apart the most typical of American spring weekends, driven by rage or madness, the bloodiest by suspected racist hate, reports AP.

The crime scenes represented a cross-section of ordinariness — a grocery store in upstate New York, a California church, a Texas flea market, the streets near a basketball arena in Wisconsin.

The carnage Americans see on their screens is not from an invading force. It is from within. The United States is a cauldron of seething grievances and poisonous social media conspiracy theories that have even gained purchase with some in power.

There is, by now, a pattern after mass shootings — shock, thoughts, prayers, vows to do something, then collective slumped shoulders as attention moves on and it becomes clear nothing much will change.

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