The weather service called preliminary rainfall totals “staggering,” including 11 inches (27.9 centimeters) at the base of Marin County’s Mount Tamalpais and and 4.02 inches (10.2 centimeters) in downtown San Francisco.

 A massive storm barreled toward Southern California on Monday after flooding highways, toppling trees and causing rock slides and mud flows in areas burned bare by wildfires across the northern half of the state, AP reports.

Drenching rains and strong winds accompanied the weekend arrival of an atmospheric river — a long plume of Pacific moisture — into the drought-stricken state.

Rainfall records were shattered and heavy snow pounded high elevations of the Sierra Nevada. The National Weather Service peppered the state with flash flood warnings.

Flooding was reported across the San Francisco Bay Area, closing streets in Berkeley, inundating Oakland’s Bay Bridge toll plaza and overflowing rivers in Napa and Sonoma counties. Power poles were downed and tens of thousands of people in the North Bay were without electricity.

“It’s been a memorable past 24 hours for the Bay Area as the long talked-about atmospheric river rolled through the region,” the local weather office said. “We literally have gone from fire/drought conditions to flooding in one storm cycle.”

The weather service called preliminary rainfall totals “staggering,” including 11 inches (27.9 centimeters) at the base of Marin County’s Mount Tamalpais and and 4.02 inches (10.2 centimeters) in downtown San Francisco.

“It looks like yesterday was the 4th wettest day ever for downtown SF where records go back to the Gold Rush years,” the weather service said.

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