The government was already under pressure to explain why the cellphones of dozens of people connected to the separatist movement in Spain’s northeastern Catalonia region were infected with Pegasus between 2017 and 2020. Covert spying operations in Spain require judicial consent.

Spain’s government said Tuesday it had nothing to hide amid mounting unease over national security controversies involving Pegasus spyware, including the hacking of the prime minister’s cellphone and spying on Catalan separatists by unknown agents, AP reports.

Cabinet spokeswoman Isabel Rodríguez promised that the Socialist-led coalition government will engage in “the utmost collaboration with the legal authorities, including declassifying relevant documents if it proves necessary.”

Rodríguez faced a barrage of questions about the extraordinary security breaches after the weekly Cabinet meeting, when she failed to mention them in her opening remarks as the government tries to contain the political damage from the recent spying revelations.

On Monday, the government revealed that the cellphones of Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez and Defense Minister Margarita Robles were infected last year with Pegasus spyware, which is available only to countries’ government agencies.

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