“We were afraid to go out, to let them go out into the yard, we were afraid to let them ride bicycles or play football. We were just so scared and we decided that that was enough. It was time to flee,” she said, describing the decision she and many of her neighbors were forced to take.

Nataliya Hibska quickly brushes her teeth and makes the bed. She is rushing to her new job.

From a small hostel room in eastern Warsaw, Hibska, a Ukrainian refugee, is slowly rebuilding her life, which was abruptly upended by Russia’s invasion of her homeland, the AP’s Monika Scislowska reports.

European Union member nations like Poland and Romania — the two neighboring countries to have received the most refugees from Ukraine — have launched programs to help them integrate.

The 47-year-old former manager of a private education center from Kharkiv, in eastern Ukraine, Hibska fled her hometown after a second wave of shelling. When bombs struck a nearby military warehouse, rattling her home, she knew it was time to leave and seek refuge for herself and her 11-year-old son.

“We were afraid to go out, to let them go out into the yard, we were afraid to let them ride bicycles or play football. We were just so scared and we decided that that was enough. It was time to flee,” she said, describing the decision she and many of her neighbors were forced to take.

Read more

© Copyright LaPresse