“From the beginning, there was no plan,” said Tara Smith, an infectious disease epidemiologist and professor at Kent State University who co-authored a paper in January that emphasized the importance of addressing vaccine concerns immediately. “It’s been a lot of ad hoc work at every level to see what might help and what doesn’t.”

One or two donuts, a car, $1 million, $25, Super Bowl ticketsfrench fries.

There’s a remarkable range of incentives and other methods devised to overcome Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy. While some of these ideas have stuck like spaghetti thrown against a wall, it’s not clear which are most effective. Even when researchers have demonstrated the success of certain strategies, they haven’t been widely adopted, as Stat News reports.

The White House announced Monday that 70% of adults across the country are now fully vaccinated, and 80% have gotten at least one shot. But progress is slow, as daily vaccination rates remain low compared with the peak in April.

“From the beginning, there was no plan,” said Tara Smith, an infectious disease epidemiologist and professor at Kent State University who co-authored a paper in January that emphasized the importance of addressing vaccine concerns immediately. “It’s been a lot of ad hoc work at every level to see what might help and what doesn’t.”

Private businesses from Shake Shack to Krispy Kreme to the NFL offered free goods and coupons for rewards as simple as a free side of fries and as adventurous as a drawing for amusement park tickets. They may have been effective marketing, but whether such strategies have moved people to get shots is an open question. The few studies evaluating these and more systematic methods have yielded mixed results.

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